More Hidden Costs of Disengaged Workers

hiddencostsIn an earlier post we discussed the direct and “hidden” costs of disengaged workers.

Carrying-on with this theme, a recent discussion among a group of Continuous Improvement leaders included some additional perspectives on the real-but-often-hidden costs associated with disengaged workers:

  • Higher turnover: Disengaged employees leave their employer as soon as they see a better opportunity. The turnover increases the costs of recruiting, on-boarding, and training.
  • Greater risk: Every newly-hired person comes with the risk of being a bad fit, or worse!  Every employee leaving an organization takes with him some organizational knowledge that might have been helpful to future decisions.
  • Lower productivity: A disengaged employee does not go the extra mile or challenge the status-quo.
  • Little or no process improvement: Improvements require engagement, a willingness to design and conduct experiments, a willingness to try something new and potentially better.  Disengaged employees focused on their personal agendas see little upside in risking trying something new in an effort to forward the organization’s goals.
  •  Higher pay: When we say about someone, “They are only in it for the money,” we are observing disengagement.  While money is important to nearly everyone, if that is the only motivation, there is no genuine engagement.  Organizations that are unable to create an environment that intrinsically engages their employees must pay them more to keep and motivate them.

Possibly you have some ideas we might add to the list?