Change: the Way Things Could or Should Be?

We all know the pace of change has significantly accelerated over the past ten years and is continuing to do so. This faster pace is often referenced as being exponential!

People most often agree that change is an important and necessary element of success but, truth be told, we don’t really like it. It is far more common to feel that “change is good and I think YOU should.”

Yet the value of change is clear. Consider that 100 years ago the average life expectancy in the United States was 53.1 compared to 78.8 today. Only 35% of households had electricity in 1920, and only 1% had both electricity and running water.

Business examples of what happens without change include Converse in sneakers, Kodak in photography, and Blockbuster in video. Each of these established and successful entities experienced significant declines in market share (or worse!) and profits as competitors introduced new and improved, lower-cost alternatives.

What Could or Should Be?
We have defined “waste” as the difference between the way things are now and the way they could or should be if everything were right. While this definition still rings oh-so-true today, what has changed is the expectations many have of what could or should be.

Who, ten years ago, would have thought there could be self-driving cars? Who would have envisioned a supermarket without checkout stations? Who could have imagined a printer that could generate 3-D objects? Yet all of these things, and many others of similar proportion, have suddenly become real.

Considering the exponential pace of change and the enhanced expectations of what could or should be, business leaders will need to find more innovative and timely ways to promote and bring about change and improvements to eliminate waste in all work processes if they are to maintain their competitive positions. Their customers will, one way or the other, demand this way of managing a business. Or as we’ve always called it, “The Right Way To Manage©.”

Our next post will focus on specific steps for successfully driving organizational and cultural change.