what should we improve?

Spring boarding off of our previous two posts on decision making, people often fall into the pitfall of missing the biggest opportunities for improvement because they ‘decide’ on a solution before evaluating the best opportunities for improvement.

In other words, instead of trying to identify waste, they come up with lists of idea driven improvements.

This happens very simply when someone comes up with an idea for an improvement (usually some new technology or equipment that will do something faster or better), puts together a proposal, and then tries to implement it.

The problem with the idea-driven approach is that there is very little correlation between the list of ideas for improvement and the biggest problems or opportunities for improvement within the organization. As noted above, the idea-driven approach to improvement depends on someone identifying a solution at the outset.

The biggest opportunities are usually buried in the tough long-term problems for which solutions are not immediately obvious to anyone! If a solution doesn’t occur to someone, the problem doesn’t make the list. If it doesn’t make the list, it is never studied sufficiently to come up with a solution.

Organizations get further faster by identifying the waste first and choosing the best opportunities from all of the areas of waste you have identified. A portion of the waste is easily spotted and addressed if you take the time to collect the information. But much of the waste is hidden — built into budgets, accepted practices, current operating procedures, and shared assumptions. It is built into processes that are compensating for problems that have not yet been solved. This waste is difficult to see without expanding the vision of what is possible.

How to identify the waste?
Over the years, we have seen several approaches to identifying the waste put into practice. Four such approaches will be the subject of our next post.