The value of a written problem statement

problem

Few decisions have a greater impact on the likelihood of an improvement project’s success than the definition of the problem.

Stephen Covey says that, “The way we see the problem is the problem!”

In a past post, we shared four guidelines for accurately defining problems, which included:

  1. Defining the problem in writing
  2. Specifying and quantifying the waste the problem is causing
  3. Identify the metric that will be use to “size” the problem
  4. Omit judgments, opinions, and predispositions about the underlying causes

These aspects of framing a problem have a huge impact on how well a team can analyze and solve a problem. They also enable a team to create an accurate problem statement.

In fact, creating a written, specific and measurable problem statement that incorporates a baseline against which solutions can be tested helps people avoid biases about root cases or solutions. This practices also makes clear why and how much we should care about the problem, and might inspire a team leader and sponsor to more enthusiastically guide the team to efficiently achieving the results the organization desires.

The act of crafting a problem statement does require some careful thought, but a good problem statement is worth the effort because it helps you to ensure that:

  • Team participants, leaders and sponsors, have a shared understanding of the problem that will be solved
  • The organization will give the project the appropriate priority and urgency
  • The team has a good baseline against which they can test the results of their solutions
  • The team is open to surfacing and testing a range of possible root causes so as to increase the likelihood of finding an effective and lasting solution.