Tag Archives: decision-making pitfalls

Decision-Making Pitfalls: Part 2

Decision-Making Pitfalls

Our previous post shared data from a Wall Street Journal article about decision-making, which indicated that the way in which leaders make decisions (the process) is just as important as what decisions they make.

In that article, author Robert I. Sutton described four specific pitfalls associated with the decision-making process that can compromise a leader’s effectiveness as well as the effectiveness and attitudes of people throughout the organization.

The first of these pitfalls, which was the subject of our previous post, involves telling people they have a voice in decision-making when, in reality, they don’t.

Next on the list is the poor habit some leaders have of “treating final decisions as anything but!”

“Many insecure bosses have a habit that is especially damaging: After a decision has been made and communicated and implementation has begun, their insecurity compels them to revisit the choice too soon and too often. A few complaints, a small early setback, or simply anxiety about the decision can provoke such unnecessary reconsideration.”

Sutton goes on to explain that the insecurity and waffling “infects their teams.”  In addition, many of the people involved lose faith in their leaders’ ability to make good decisions, and also lose interest in implementing new directives that could soon become subject to change.

We will take a look at two additional decision-making pitfalls in our next post.

Decision Making Pitfalls – Part 1

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, Robert I. Sutton, a professor in the department of management science and engineering at Stanford University and co-author of “Scaling Up Excellence,” shared some interesting and important insight into decision-making.

In his article, Sutton makes several points consistent with the fact that all work (i.e., decision making) is part of a process, and every process can be improved.

For example, he first explains that in organizations of all types, how  leaders make decisions (the process) is just as important as what decisions they make.

Sutton then described four specific pitfalls associated with the decision-making process that can compromise a leader’s effectiveness as well as the effectiveness and attitudes of people throughout the organization.

The first of these pitfalls involves telling people they have a voice in decision-making when, in reality, they don’t.

“Good decision-making entails consulting key stakeholders—and using their input to shape final choices,” Sutton said.  “Doing so improves the quality of the decisions, and makes employees more motivated to implement them.”

Unfortunately, in too many cases the consultation of others is only make believe… it starts out looking like the real thing, but in the end leaders are just pretending that others’ input has some influence over the final decision.

While the motivating force behind the make-believe-consultation can vary — some bosses do it to fool people into getting behind the decision’s implementation, and others because they think the mere opportunity to voice opinions somehow makes people feel better — it doesn’t matter. In the end, pretending to consult others for decision-making purposes and then ignoring their input turns out to be demoralizing. Further, the associated deception and disrespect often causes employees or stakeholders to lose faith in their leaders.

In upcoming posts we’ll look at three additional pitfalls related to “how” decisions are made, and how each impacts all of the people involved.