Tag Archives: how to drive engagemet

how to lower the cost of disengaged workers

cost die

Continuing with the theme of employee engagement, or the lack thereof, people readily agree that disengaged workers are “expensive.”

For example, recent data shared by Gallup indicates that 74% of actively disengaged workers are actively seeking alternative employment. Along those lines, turnover is much higher among disengaged workers, as is absenteeism.

In addition, if the predominant environment within an organization is one of disengagement, productivity and profitability are lower, there is little or no continuous improvement, and pay tends to be higher.

Clearly it is advantageous to engage our employees or, at least, make a concerted effort to address and lower the costs associated with disengagement.

Here are a few suggestions for driving engagement within a business organization and for lowering the costs of disengagement based on input from CI professionals and leaders:

  • Enhanced recruiting and on-boarding – At an Engagement World Conference, leaders from several organizations explained how they had increased employee engagement and retention beginning at the recruiting stage. The first steps involved the inclusion of the organization’s mission and vision into interviewing conversations, and a more conscious effort to identify and hire people with aligned goals. Adding a mentor program to the on-boarding process helped new hires assimilate faster so they became more productive in less time.

    Enabling people to achieve higher levels of productivity and success early-on not only promotes greater engagement levels, but also reduces first-year attrition rates, which are often among the highest. Early churn tends to demoralize the entire workforce as well, so in addition to reducing rehiring and re-training costs, the costs associated with negativity within the existing workforce are also reduced.
  • Flexibility and work/life balance – Employer/employee relationships, expectations, and engagement criteria have evolved significantly over the course of the pandemic. Depending on the type of organization, scheduling and work-from-home options has become a priority in many workplaces.
  • Consistent performance management and communication – People need to find meaning in their work, and understand how their work aligns with organizational objectives. This point was well made by several speakers in an episode of TED Radio Hour, called The Meaning of Work. If managers communicate a shared purpose or sense of direction, and encourage employees to openly share their perspectives and input, then they can increase employee engagement.

    This type of communication works best when systematized as part of structured, proactive approach to performance management. This methodology includes frequent feedback rather than annual performance appraisals and reviews, ongoing engagement surveys (i.e., e-Net Promoter Score) with real-time feedback loops, and protocols for keeping people aware of how individual work impacts organizational goals and how it aligns with mission and vision.
  • Learning and development – A young, seemingly fast-rising junior executive had been working at a large bank for just over six years. When he was asked about his job and how he felt about it he said, “The job’s OK.” His lack of enthusiasm was evident, and when pressed to say more he added, “Well, I’m not really learning much anymore.” He went on to confirm that he was not truly engaged, and that he did not make much of an extra or discretionary effort, which engaged workers regularly put forward. Only recently has it become clear to forward-thinking business leaders that the path to sustainable employee engagement is to drive productivity, and to do so through ongoing education and empowerment. In support of this perspective, a recent article in Human Resource Executive magazine identified “continuous learning opportunities and personal development” as being two of the four key criteria (scheduling flexibility and social responsibility being the other two) recent graduates value most as they evaluate career options.
  • Recognition and rewards – Recognizing and rewarding employees is not a new concept, but if the goal is to engage workers rather than simply acknowledge milestones (such as length of service), then the approach must be different and must be aligned with what is meaningful to each recipient.