Tag Archives: R&R

Rewards & Recognition – Part 1: Variation

We recently attended the “Engagement World” expo in Galveston, Texas, at which all aspects of enterprise engagement were discussed including ISO 10018 and  standardized engagement plans.

Simply stated, to be truly effective, an engagement plan must contain certain elements, including a method for rewarding and recognizing  desired behaviors and outcomes.

This fact was spelled-out in a prior post, noting that Rewards & Recognition is an important component of a comprehensive engagement plan. In addition, our Partners in Improvement discussed this fact, and shared some interesting insights regarding various ways of recognizing and rewarding people, and the variation in results.

For example,  some, like a service award, are very predictable; if you reach an anniversary, you are likely to receive one. But many other recognition programs include an element of surprise when exceptional service is spotted.

Some rewards cost the organization little or nothing — such as a thank you note or a special parking place. Others are quite costly, such as a one year lease on a car, or an upscale ‘President’s Award.’

Some are for teams, and others are for individuals. Many of the rewards and recognition are after the fact, while some are announced and hyped in advance in order to encourage people to try for them.

The amazing variety allowed us to explore the benefits and unexpected drawbacks of the different types of rewards and recognition. But despite the variety of implementations, the objectives were really quite simple. An organization implements a reward and recognition program for one of these three reasons:

  1. To increase the recipient’s satisfaction and happiness with the organization and his or her role within it
  2. To motivate continuation of certain types of behaviors and accomplishments
  3. To motivate people to work to achieve certain measurable results

We’ll take a closer look at these differing approaches in our next few posts, and share some surprising data points regarding outcomes and predictability.