Tag Archives: workforce engagement

Engaging Your Workforce: A Front-line Manager’s Recognition Tip Sheet

A recent article published by Engagement Strategies Media, outlined five specific best practices for front-line managers to help them more systematically recognize and engage their workforce.

As you may know, the recognition field has seen a significant shift over the past several years, going from traditional length-of-service awards to programs that focus on supporting critical organizational goals — i.e., quality service to internal or external customers, participation in volunteer initiatives, a willingness to go the extra mile, etc. In most cases, the success of these efforts depends upon the managers at the front lines.

It’s also true that many employees become disengaged or leave their jobs because of an immediate supervisor, not because of the company or pay. Here’s a tip sheet for front-line managers that lists five ways in which they can implement a systematic and effective approach to recognizing team members:

1.) Start With the Basics of the Work
The first step for front-line managers is to show employees that they and their work are valued and appreciated. Initially this might involve giving them a sense of ownership, and making the practice of expressing simple appreciation a standard part of day-to-day management. To ensure consistency, the prudent manager schedules regular time with each employee to make sure they understand their job goals and how their work makes a difference. It’s also important to make recognition meaningful. Don’t go overboard by praising everyday basics such as showing up for work on time or keeping a clean desk.

2.) Continually Reinforce Goals and Values
It’s equally as important to make sure team members understand the organization’s goals and values, which might include a commitment to superior customer service, continuous improvement, innovation, or inclusiveness. Don’t make employees guess—every employee should know the organization’s goals, organizational values and the role they individually can play. Take advantage of team meetings or employee newsletters to regularly reinforce the key messages and goals, and what the values mean in terms of actions and behaviors. This might include simple things such as “how we treat one another,” as well as things more directly associated with how the work gets done.

3.) Recognize employees for both their individual and group contributions. Not everyone likes public praise, so managers must get to know employees and tailor their recognition style based on each person’s preferences. When recognizing a group, make sure to acknowledge each person’s contribution. Be inclusive—recognize everyone who does something meaningful that supports the company’s values or goals through their actions. However, if you publicly recognize someone who doesn’t deserve it, you’ll devalue the whole process.

4.) Planned and Spontaneous Recognition. Formal recognition events can take place monthly, yearly, or almost any time. They’re great ways to celebrate achievements, but try to recognize employees whenever it is merited. In general, praise employees as soon as possible after an accomplishment.

5.) Leverage Internal Communications. If your organization has a print or online newsletter or social recognition platform, an article or post highlighting an employee’s achievement is a very effective way to show appreciation in a way that helps communicate and reinforce values and goals to everyone. How you recognize individuals can be inspiring to their colleagues as well.

Keep in mind that the personal touch, sincerely delivered whenever warranted, is key to keeping your team members feeling valued, motivated and excited about doing the best they can at their jobs each and every day. Studies show that front-line managers can make or break the employee experience.

Read the full article…

Engagement, Motivation & Work

Enterprise engagement has been a frequently-addressed topic in this blog, and a recent post shared some of our Partners in Improvement group’s thoughts on an important element of an engagement strategy — rewards and recognition.

In that post, several points were made about being careful with the use of extrinsic, or monetary rewards as motivators.

To add some additional perspective,  the Enterprise Engagement Alliance shared information from a past New York Times column “The Secret of Effective Motivation,” in which authors Amy Wrzesniewski, Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Yale School of Management, and Barry Schwartz, Professor of Psychology at Swarthmore College, suggest that the most effective type of motivation in terms of actual long-term results is action based on an internal motive — that is, “the pleasure derived from the activity and results themselves rather than from an instrumental motive such as the desire for fame or money.”

“Helping people focus on the meaning and impact of their work, rather than on, say, the financial returns it will bring, may be the best way to improve not only the quality of their work but also… their financial success,” the article states.

This viewpoint is well-aligned with our “Engagement Around the Work” approach, which involves specific steps for achieving a
culture of engagement that is linked with team productivity, performance, and job satisfaction.

This approach incorporates a clear objective of engaging people around the one thing they all have in common—and the one thing that can bring about increased profitability and a sustainable competitive edge—the work.

As Bill Conway often said, “It’s all about the work!”

Read “Engagement Around the Work” white paper.

Free Engagement ROI Calculator

The Enterprise Engagement Alliance recently announced that their Enterprise Engagement Academy has created a free ROI Calculator that is available to any organization at no cost (see link below).

The tool can be used to track the potential return-on-investment of an engagement initiative, and also provides a report showing the estimated impact of improving employee engagement.

According to Allan Schweyer, Curriculum Director for the Enterprise Engagement Academy and founder of the TMLU professional learning platform, the ROI Calculator is based on “very conservative estimates of the impact of lower and higher levels of engagement created by the Center for Talent Solutions.”

Full article…ROI calculator

Engagement vs. Disengagement – What’s at Stake?

Recent posts have focused on various ways of promoting workforce engagement, which has been among the most popular topics among business leaders over the past 12-24 months.

However, it is less common to hear people speak in specific terms about the real, often hidden, costs associated with disengagement.

During recent meetings with our Partners in Improvement, a group of Improvement specialists from across North America, these costs were discussed in detail. The Partners’ conclusions were well-aligned with those published by numerous sources, including the Enterprise Engagement Alliance and Gallup.

Simply stated, disengaged employees create a negative and expensive ripple effect throughout an organization, and drive-up costs in five specific ways:

Higher turnover: Disengaged employees leave their employers as soon as they see a better opportunity. This turnover increases the costs of recruiting, on-boarding, and training, which typically range between 16% – 22% of salary for low-to-mid-level employees, and significantly more for higher-level executives based on a Center for American Progress study. In addition, every new hire brings a risk of a bad fit, and every employee leaving an organization takes with them some organizational knowledge that might have been helpful to that organization in future decisions.

Lower productivity, lower profitability: Disengaged employees don’t go the extra mile; they do not make an extra effort when faced with a challenge, and don’t put forth the same discretionary effort that an engaged person will make. An article published by the Harvard Business Review said that organizations with high levels of employee engagement yield a 22% increase in productivity over the norm.

Similarly, the Engaged Company Stock Index, which tracks the long-term results of companies with high levels of customer, employee, and community engagement as determined by independent data sources compiled by McBassi & Company, has outperformed the S&P 500 (including dividends) by 36.2 percentage points since October 1, 2012.

Little or no process improvement: Improvement requires engagement — a willingness to design and conduct experiments, a willingness to take risks to try something new and potentially better. However, disengaged employees tend to focus on their personal agendas and see little upside in trying something new to forward the organization’s goals.

Higher pay: When we say about someone, “They are only in it for the money,” we are observing disengagement. While money is important to nearly everyone, if that is the only motivation, there is no genuine engagement. As the behavioral economist, Dan Ariely, said, “Money is the most expensive way to motivate someone.”

Organizations that are unable to create an environment that intrinsically engages their employees must pay them more to keep and motivate them.

The associated cost of lost opportunities is difficult to calculate; but our experience and data surfaced over the past three-plus decades has consistently shown that, of the four primary forms of waste (capital waste, lost time, material waste, lost opportunities), the “lost opportunities” are the greatest.

Considering the above-listed realities, it is not surprising that ISO 10018, which provides guidance on engaging people in an organization’s quality management system, has become more prominent and a new certification created.

Our next post will focus on specific ways to reduce or eliminate these real costs of disengagement.

10 Workplace Behaviors that Promote Engagement & a High-Performing Culture

As noted in a previous post, new ISO Standards (ISO 10018) are about to be introduced, which will focus on employee engagement.  This development is considered long-overdue by many, as  surprisingly few organizations have a formalized engagement strategy.

If you would like to create such a strategy, here are ten behaviors  you might initiate, which are based on our research and experience that shows productive employees tend to be engaged employees (as opposed to the other way around. Read more on this perspective…).

  1. As with all change initiatives, get acceptance and buy-in from senior leaders. Little will be accomplished without this; the best results are achieved when leaders understand the benefits of engagement and take action.
  2. Create a formalized implementation plan and establish performance measures so that progress can be tracked. Develop realistic, achievable, and measurable goals and objectives.
  3. Work with the leaders so that they can model the right behaviors and cascade the concepts to their reports and throughout the organization.
  4. Create and equip project teams to identify and quantify opportunities for
    improvement.
  5. Foster an atmosphere of collaboration, innovation, continuous improvement, and fun.
  6. Make sure people have the knowledge and skills needed to succeed.
  7. Empower people to take action.
  8. Implement an appropriate integrated communication plan, reinforcing the concept of improving both the “work and workplace.”
  9. Reward and recognize people so that they feel supported in their efforts.
  10. Measure return on investment, and reinvest appropriately in the above-listed activities.

 

ISO Standards for Engagement!

New ISO Standards, ISO 10018, are about to be introduced, which will focus on employee engagement.

Created by the same ISO Technical Advisory Group that manages ISO 9000 quality standards, the ISO 10018 standards focus on people involvement and competence to help organizations maximize success through people.

The 10018 standards create a clear road map for organizations that seek to maximize results by providing employees with the “ability to apply knowledge and skills to achieve intended results” and “by engaging (them) in and contributing to shared objectives,” according to Peter Merrill, the convener for this standard.

The new ISO 10018 quality management standard and certification promises to create a new avenue for formal engagement strategies. Because more than 35,000 U.S. companies alone follow IS0 9001 standards – which already include requirements related to employee training and development – there exists a large community of Quality Management professionals potentially interested in ISO 10018, representing a new avenue for organizations that provide formal engagement services and products.

Read more…

 

Work Matters!

A blog post by Dr. Dr. Alison Eyring, the founder and CEO of Organisation Solutions, a global consultancy specializing in organizational design, references the the degree to which so many world-renowned journalists are commitment to their work.

“Their work has meaning,” she writes. “It is important. It matters. They matter.”

Eyring goes on to discuss engagement, and how it can mean many things to many people.  But overall, “it has to do with the degree to which people are willing to expend discretionary effort… to do great work, to stay in the company and to contribute to the community of employees around them.”

Yet despite the millions of dollars spent on various activities attempting to “engage” employees, many employers find the majority of their employees are disengaged (70% based on recent Gallup polls).

Eyring also states that “work motivates and satisfies us when it has meaning, offers autonomy, and leverages a variety of skills. If we want high levels of engagement, we have to go beyond leader behavior or employee characteristics and look to the way we structure work.”

This perspective is well-aligned with our Engagement Around the Work” white paper.

The simple truth is that people prefer to work in an environment where their work is important — where their work matters; and in an environment in which they can be productive.

In the end, working on things that matter to us and working productively are the key drivers of sustainable engagement.

Ten Things Engaged Workers Say…

Data presented by Gallup during a recent event was very compelling, and might well give organizational leadership some clear targets for better-engaging their workforce.

Based on the research shared, here are ten things that engaged workers tend to say:

  1. I’ve been recognized for my work in the past 7 days
  2. My supervisor seems to care about me
  3. Someone at work encourages my development
  4. My opinions seem to count at work
  5. In the past 6 months someone has talked about my development
  6. I know what’s expected of me at work
  7. I have the opportunity to learn at work
  8. I have the opportunity to use my strengths at work
  9. The company’s mission, values and goals make me feel that my work is important
  10. I have a best friend at work

Aligning Organizational Culture & Strategy

culture4Continuing our theme of how organizational culture is a key driver of continuous improvement, it is important to properly align strategies with culture because culture can support or constrain strategy in a number of ways.

For example, an organization that that fosters employee engagement supports a culture of hard work, innovation, and “going the extra mile;” a culture in which people generally like coming to work. Such a culture enables successful execution on a strategy to give customers better responsiveness and reliability.

Similarly, a culture of caring and respect for others is essential to a strategy based on providing the most helpful and caring service to customers so as to win loyalty and referrals. For example, one of the Partners described how their cultural value of giving back to their communities in donations and volunteerism enabled them to appeal to the civic-mindedness that their customers valued. Another described “maverick thinking” that prompted employees to challenge things that were not quite right as a culture that supported the strategy of constantly improving safety, quality, and efficiency.

Each of these examples described core strategies that were aligned with and supported by their cultures.

But what if an organization’s culture no longer supports a winning strategy?

Sometimes a culture becomes out-of-step with its strategy due to internal changes. For example, a change in leadership behaviors can very easily shift an organization’s culture from engaged to disengaged, from collaborative to everyone out for his or herself, from maverick thinkers to risk-averse CYA’s. Careful work is required to rebuild and to sustain the cultures that support the strategy.

Sometimes, leadership must create a new strategy that the culture is ill-equipped to support when external factors change. For example, a company with a culture that values tradition and continuity will suffer from the entrance to the market by an innovative, paradigm-changing upstart. A company that thrived by attracting and rewarding hot shot individuals may struggle when the market begins to demand sophisticated coordination and execution. A company that thrived on risk taking may suffer when expectation about quality and reliability rise.

Clearly in some instances the culture must change, or it will devour the organization’s strategy and everyone will be out of work.

Who Benefits from Employee Engagement?

A thought-provoking blog post by Bertrand Duperrin raises the question, “Who benefits from employee engagement?”

As the data pictured below indicates, certainly the organization benefits…

engagementchart2

But do team members benefit as well?

The premise presented in the post suggests that in a truly-successful engaement model, the answer is yes.

However, the article goes on to explain that some organizations use engagement as a means of getting more out of the work force for less pay.

This approach violates the long-term focus that is an essential component of a successful engagement program. It also may come back to hurt the organization in the long-run.

“When engagement is paid in return it’s called well being, and that’s a sustainable performance lever,” Duperrin says. “When it’s one way and benefits only to the enterprise, it’s a short term vision that will backfire.”

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